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Where should we donate to do the most good? - Essay Competition 3rd Prize

With 17 new Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) recently announced, the United Nations member states will again put eradicating poverty, in all it’s dimensions, at the heart of the global agenda.This time the focus is on sustainability, with environmental degradation and a changing climate being recognised as two of the greatest threats to meeting UN aspirations.

Reach for systemic change

Effective altruists love systemic change – and they should. Last year, GiveWell moved $27.8 million to effective charities. At the same time, the U.S. government spent over $52 billion in foreign assistance to a variety of ends, from tanks for Egypt to mass distribution of insecticide treated nets (LLINs). Clearly, the impact of increasing the portion of foreign aid allocated to effective programs focused on evidence-backed interventions could have an enormous impact. The only question is tractability: is investing in influencing policy likely to yield results?

Giving What We Can for People of Faith

Giving What We Can is a secular organisation, but it welcomes people from all backgrounds, including people for whom faith is a part of their lives. Religious members of Giving What We Can often see their pledge as part of their commitment to model their life on the teachings of their faith. People from a range of religions, denominations and traditions have taken the Giving What We Can pledge — a few have shared their stories below.

Maternal Age Matters: for a lifetime, and longer

Maternal age matters—for the mother's own health and survival, for her child's well-being throughout his or her lifetime, and even longer if the well-described intergenerational cycle of growth failure continues into the next generation, according to a recent article published in The Lancet Global Health[1]

How To Overcome the Disappointment of Not Receiving This Year's Nobel Prize for Medicine

Thirty-two times in a row now I've failed to win the Nobel Prize. Each year I have to swallow the same bitter medicine. These Nobel Prizes celebrate the extraordinary achievements of extraordinary people and they show me how worm-like I am in comparison. But there is a way to overcome this. If you, like I, have the post-Nobel blues, then this article might help.

Confessions of a Giving What We Can member - how the pledge saves lives

Unlike most hobbies and pastimes picked up in my university years, Giving What We Can has become a bigger part of my life over time. I first learnt of the organization when, as a frustrated medical student, I was browsing the web looking for a forum or community which would empathise with how I felt about the world. Even though I was studying to be a doctor, I felt that there was so much more I could be doing with my time and money that could actually save lives.