Case Studies: People Who Pledge To Give

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Wondering what it's like to pledge to give more, and give more effectively?
Read our member stories and quotes.

Stories about people who pledge to give

Member NameDate of StoryLocationPledgeShort Bio
Catherine ThomasOctober 2020Palo Alto, CA, USAThe Pledge
2015
PhD student in social and cultural psychology from California who has worked in global health and international development for 11 years.
Pablo OllierSeptember 2020Billom, FranceThe Pledge
2020
Philosophy teacher and competitive chess player
Heather McLaughlinJuly 2020Taree, NSW, AustraliaThe Pledge
2012
Retired teacher who continues to give 10-14% of her retirement income to effective charities
Sophia ChengJuly 2020London, England, UKThe Pledge
2020
Arvind RaghavanJanuary 2020London, England, UKThe Pledge
2016
Product manager at Citi
Allan SaldanhaNovember 2019London, England, UKThe Pledge
2014
Audit manager
Insa MännelOctober 2019Osnabrück, GermanyThe Pledge
2017
Referendarin at the Landgericht Kleve
Jo DuyvestynAugust 2019Leiden, NetherlandsThe Pledge
2014
Researcher and PhD candidate at Leiden University Medical Center
Mathias Kirk BondeMay 2019Frederiksberg, DenmarkThe Pledge
2018
Mathias Kirk Bonde is a software developer at IBM Denmark
Catherine LowApril 2019Christchurch, New ZealandThe Pledge
2015
Former physics teacher who now works in groups support at the Centre for Effective Altruism
Max GhenisJanuary 2019Oxnard, CA, USAThe Pledge
2019
Founder and President of the UBI Center
Matthew AllcockJuly 2017Sheffield, England, UKThe Pledge
2017
Natural hazards researcher at EDF Energy
Erwan AtchesonJanuary 2017Belfast, Northern Ireland, UKThe Pledge
2013
Research Scientist at Queen's University Belfast
d'Arcy LunnJanuary 2016Blewitt Springs, SA, AustraliaThe Pledge
2015
Group head of sustainability and global citizenship at Dulwich College International
Ali LadakDecember 2015Brighton and Hove, England, UKThe Pledge
2015
Julia WiseDecember 2015Somerville, MA, USAThe Pledge
2012
Community health liaison and former social worker
Mark BarnesAugust 2015London, England, UKThe Pledge
2015
Mark Barnes is a travel blogger at Anywhere We Roam
Elizabeth Barnes July 2015Devon, England, UKThe Pledge
2014
Researcher at OpenAI
Toby OrdJuly 2015Oxford, England, UKFurther Pledge
2009
Co-founder of Giving What We Can, philosopher, author of The Precipice, and a researcher at Future of Humanity Institute
Coralie OddyJune 2015London, England, UKThe Pledge
2015
Speech and language therapist at ReminiSense
Katherine SteinerFebruary 2015Oxford, England, UKThe Pledge
2014
Assistant librarian at the Bodleian Education Library
Sashika CoxheadJuly 2014London, England, UKThe Pledge
2013
Doctor at Homerton University Hospital
Parmeet ShahJune 2014Mumbai, Maharashtra, IndiaThe Pledge
2014
Director of marketing at Marathon Realty Ltd. and the Chief Executive Officer of NEXT School Mumbai
Lee BishopApril 2013Edinburgh, Scotland, UKThe Pledge
2010
Senior program manager at Amazon
Boris YakubchikFebruary 2013Morganville, NJ, USAThe Pledge
2013
Developer at Forbes in Jersey City, NJ.
Richard ChappellNovember 2010Miami, FL, USAThe Pledge
2010
Assistant Professor of Philosophy at the University of Miami

Quotes from people who pledge to give

QuoteMemberLocationBioPledge
In September 2012, I took the Giving When We Can pledge and have been supporting some of GiveWell’s top recommended charities, such as Against Malaria Foundation, Evidence Action, and GiveDirectly.Heather McLaughlinTaree, NSW, AustraliaRetired teacher who continues to give 10-14% of her retirement income to effective charitiesThe Pledge
2012
I'm motivated to give because of the simple fact that purely by luck, I have had health, modest wealth, and opportunity, while many others don't.Heather McLaughlinTaree, NSW, AustraliaRetired teacher who continues to give 10-14% of her retirement income to effective charitiesThe Pledge
2012
I had just been paid more money per hour than my friends and colleagues in Kyrgyzstan earned in a month, but here’s the thing - I didn’t work harder than my friends, I wasn’t smarter, I didn’t work longer hours. The only difference between us was where we were born.d'Arcy LunnBlewitt Springs, SA, AustraliaGroup head of sustainability and global citizenship at Dulwich College InternationalThe Pledge
2015
I date the start of the Effective Altruism movement from the founding of Giving What We Can. I'm delighted that it has now reached the significant milestone of 5000 members, because that means a very significant sum going to help the most effective charities. But let's not forget that GWWC has done so much more than that - it has been the spark for a movement that has inspired many more people to think about their charitable giving, and about the overall direction of their lives.Peter SingerMelbourne, VIC, AustraliaMoral philosopher and author of books including Animal Liberation and The Life You Can SaveThe Pledge
2009
It’s a simple idea, but it is inspiring large numbers of people, in dozens of countries, to live their lives differently, and it has already led to hundreds of millions of pounds being donated to more effective charities than would otherwise have been the case. The result is that those donations do much more good, saving the lives of many more people and reducing far more suffering than they otherwise would have done.Peter SingerMelbourne, VIC, AustraliaMoral philosopher and author of books including Animal Liberation and The Life You Can SaveThe Pledge
2009
I look forward to the 10,000th member! I've always thought that effective giving is one of the most valuable ideas in EA and something that's worth putting more focus on, which was part of my thinking behind the annual EA survey. This growth in pledgers is heartening, and I hope it encourages EAs to spread that core, practical concept.Tom AshVancouver, BC, CanadaFounder of Rethink CharityThe Pledge
2010
To my surprise I discovered there was an entire community of people who were keen on doing it seriously. I immediately felt at home.Mathias Kirk BondeFrederiksberg, DenmarkMathias Kirk Bonde is a software developer at IBM DenmarkThe Pledge
2018
No TV or other purchase could make up for the peace I gained through giving.Mathias Kirk BondeFrederiksberg, DenmarkMathias Kirk Bonde is a software developer at IBM DenmarkThe Pledge
2018
I think that people unfamiliar with giving not only miss out on the positive impact that we can have on the lives of others, but also the positive impact on ourselves. There is a strong satisfaction in doing what you think is good!Pablo OllierBillom, FrancePhilosophy teacher and competitive chess playerThe Pledge
2020
The Giving What We Can Pledge helps me in giving efficiently and regularly. Together with Effective Altruism Funds, it is easy to make donations and track the progress of my pledge.Pablo OllierBillom, FrancePhilosophy teacher and competitive chess playerThe Pledge
2020
Of course, I could have donated by myself, but I liked the idea of genuinely committing to it and doing it together with others who share the same ideals.Insa MännelOsnabrück, GermanyReferendarin at the Landgericht KleveThe Pledge
2017
I’d always wanted to work out what the point of life was, and how I could help the world, so these ideas naturally resonated with me.Parmeet ShahMumbai, Maharashtra, IndiaDirector of marketing at Marathon Realty Ltd. and the Chief Executive Officer of NEXT School MumbaiThe Pledge
2014
Now my parents and my grandfather donate instead of giving me money for gifts and are really accepting, and I think they see the happiness I get from this community.Jo DuyvestynLeiden, NetherlandsResearcher and PhD candidate at Leiden University Medical CenterThe Pledge
2014
I’ve found the community has helped me shape some of my thoughts that weren’t fully articulated: when you talk to people, you can understand more about your own values.Jo DuyvestynLeiden, NetherlandsResearcher and PhD candidate at Leiden University Medical CenterThe Pledge
2014
At first it seemed a little weird: who just gives away thousands of dollars? But then it became normal.Catherine LowChristchurch, New ZealandFormer physics teacher who now works in groups support at the Centre for Effective AltruismThe Pledge
2015
I feel emotionally attached to donating now, I get ‘warm fuzzies.’Catherine LowChristchurch, New ZealandFormer physics teacher who now works in groups support at the Centre for Effective AltruismThe Pledge
2015
Donating a part of my income to effective charities prevents the needless suffering of many individuals.Ali LadakBrighton and Hove, England, UKThe Pledge
2015
I started off by donating 10% of my income but soon increased the amount after realising that I could easily give away more. The following year I gave away 20%, the next I increased it to a third, then to 50%. This year I intend to give away 75%.Allan SaldanhaLondon, England, UKAudit managerThe Pledge
2014
I realise I’m in a fortunate and privileged position financially to be able to do this. I earned good money for 15 years before taking the pledge and I have financial security including a significant sum in investments. I’m full of admiration for the many GWWC members who give away 10% when their incomes are at the national average or lower. Their dedication has motivated me to increase my own donations.Allan SaldanhaLondon, England, UKAudit managerThe Pledge
2014
In the last tax year, I donated £63,000 including Gift Aid to charities and non-profits such as Malaria Consortium and the SCI Foundation through an organisation called Effective Altruism Funds. Givewell, a leading independent charity evaluator, estimates the cost of saving a child’s life is just $2,000 by donating to the Malaria Consortium, a charity which distributes preventive anti-malarial drugs to children in Asia and Africa.Allan SaldanhaLondon, England, UKAudit managerThe Pledge
2014
As a father, I think the worst thing any parent can experience is to have to watch their child suffering or god forbid, dying. My children’s lives are priceless to me and so I find the opportunity to save someone else’s child’s life for less than £2,000 a compelling proposition.Allan SaldanhaLondon, England, UKAudit managerThe Pledge
2014
Ten percent of my income goes to the Against Malaria Foundation and The Humane League. It is immensely compelling that for just a couple of thousand dollars, we can save a life, Raghavan says. I give an additional 1.5% to mindfulness communities. I think Zen is very relevant today, when a lot of things can keep us busy but don’t necessarily translate to meaning or connection.Arvind RaghavanLondon, England, UKProduct manager at CitiThe Pledge
2016
For a long time I've felt that I wanted to do as much as I could to help others. I am incredibly lucky to have everything I need to have a fulfilling life, while so much of the world has so little. The ethos of effective altruism appealed to me immediately, but many of the things I learnt about how to actually do the most good surprised me.Elizabeth Barnes Devon, England, UKResearcher at OpenAIThe Pledge
2014
I’ve met a whole load of wonderful people who inspired me to do more of the things I knew I should do, including starting an effective altruism society at my college.Elizabeth Barnes Devon, England, UKResearcher at OpenAIThe Pledge
2014
Faced with a huge problem and no idea how to solve it, we either end up apathetic or cynical, or try our best without much impact. But here’s the thing – while poverty remains a huge problem, we are getting better and better at finding the best ways to solve it.Coralie OddyLondon, England, UKSpeech and language therapist at ReminiSenseThe Pledge
2015
Suddenly my hopes and doubts weren’t fighting against one another, but working together. By critically examining how charities spend their money, I could choose to give to only the most effective.Coralie OddyLondon, England, UKSpeech and language therapist at ReminiSenseThe Pledge
2015
I also decided I needed to give consistently, and hold myself accountable for doing what I’d always wanted – to make a difference, and to continue to make a difference throughout my life.Coralie OddyLondon, England, UKSpeech and language therapist at ReminiSenseThe Pledge
2015
After giving away 10% of my salary, I’m still earning more than 99% of people in the world (you can see where you fit in with Giving What We Can’s calculator).Coralie OddyLondon, England, UKSpeech and language therapist at ReminiSenseThe Pledge
2015
Now I know I am making a difference – most people could do the same.Coralie OddyLondon, England, UKSpeech and language therapist at ReminiSenseThe Pledge
2015
I first came across Giving What We Can at a talk that I went to as an undergraduate at Oxford University. The talk was about 80,000 Hours and they mentioned The Pledge. So I’d already thought that I’d donate some proportion of my income to charity but hearing about Giving What We Can really helped me raise my ambitions to donate a significant portion of my income and also think really hard about the effectiveness of the charities that I was donating to. Both those ideas made a lot of sense to me and so I signed the Further Pledge while I was an undergraduate. Fast forward 10 years and now I really enjoy being part of the effective altruism community. Many of my close, best friends, and my colleagues are people that I’ve met through EA – and that all traces back to that first meeting about 80,000 Hours, and hearing about (and signing) the Further Pledge.Habiba IslamOxford, England, UKAdvisor at 80,000 HoursFurther Pledge
2011
I’d been topping up my donations each month to the 10% mark, when I’d got my paycheque and paid my rent, and I hadn’t had to change my behaviour or spending to accommodate it. All that I had was a deep satisfaction each month that my money was winging its way to charities that are making a real, personal difference to people’s lives.Katherine SteinerOxford, England, UKAssistant librarian at the Bodleian Education LibraryThe Pledge
2014
I have pledged to give 10% of my lifetime earnings to these effective charities. And I will endeavour to do better than that. The immense benefits that some of the money I have earned can bring to individuals in poorer countries far outweigh the cost of having less money myself. In fact, the decision to donate 10% of lifetime earnings to the poorest people on the planet has come at no cost at all, for it has made me happier and given my life greater meaning.Mark BarnesLondon, England, UKMark Barnes is a travel blogger at Anywhere We RoamThe Pledge
2015
Regularly donating effectively is a natural consequence of aligning my actions with my philosophy.Matthew AllcockSheffield, England, UKNatural hazards researcher at EDF EnergyThe Pledge
2017
We are social creatures. By making this pledge publicly, I can add to a culture of giving effectively. If just one other person decides to take this pledge and donate considerably more and more effectively because of my influence then my positive impact on the world is effectively doubled.Matthew AllcockSheffield, England, UKNatural hazards researcher at EDF EnergyThe Pledge
2017
The crux is that there are vast numbers of people living in the world that only see a slither of the international pie that is disproportionately in the hands of those like myself living in a wealthy nation. Even after donating 10% of my income, I will be in the wealthiest 4.6% of the world.Matthew AllcockSheffield, England, UKNatural hazards researcher at EDF EnergyThe Pledge
2017
It’s been really incredible watching GWWC grow from a few members early on to a 5,000 strong community. It’s really incredible how much people in our community donate and how much they think about how to use those donations to help people as much as possible. I really feel it’s helped me to live up to my values and I hope it’ll make a better world for [my son] Leo to grow up in.Michelle HutchinsonOxford, England, UKHead of Advising at 80,000 HoursThe Pledge
2011
There’s no escaping the fact that money can make a huge impact: buying 10 years of deworming treatment for the cost of a latte seems like an unrivalled opportunity to me.Sashika CoxheadLondon, England, UKDoctor at Homerton University HospitalThe Pledge
2013
I don’t believe that extra 10% will increase my happiness significantly, and I certainly don’t think I will spend it on anything as valuable as multiple years of healthy life for another person.Sashika CoxheadLondon, England, UKDoctor at Homerton University HospitalThe Pledge
2013
Being part of Giving What We Can is a really fun and exciting part of my life: I get to hang out with friendly, like-minded people who are continually questioning and improving on the knowledge we have about the best ways to help others.Sashika CoxheadLondon, England, UKDoctor at Homerton University HospitalThe Pledge
2013
I’d like to see a world where using significant amounts of our wealth to help others is a completely normal thing to do, and being part of this community takes us one step closer to that.Sashika CoxheadLondon, England, UKDoctor at Homerton University HospitalThe Pledge
2013
I spent the years since university reading and thinking more about effective giving and taking the pledge. I felt like I could contribute by earning money to give away.Simran Dhaliwal Slough, England, UKManaging Director at Effective GivingThe Pledge
2014
Giving What We Can helped motivate me to think about what I wanted from life and my work. It was a contributing factor in giving me the confidence and impetus to apply for an internship in banking (through Teach First). When I got the offer from the bank, I signed the pledge online, which was a very important day for me!Simran Dhaliwal Slough, England, UKManaging Director at Effective GivingThe Pledge
2014
I feel like the pledge will make sure I am always engaged with ideas about how to make a difference most effectively. Remembering just how lucky I am to have been born where I was, have the family that I do and the opportunities that I have had.Simran Dhaliwal Slough, England, UKManaging Director at Effective GivingThe Pledge
2014
Nobody needs to have loads of money. I think I’ll be happier knowing that I´ve got a bit less but that will make a significant difference somewhere else. I’m not ashamed to say that I hope it enriches my life and increases my happiness, as well as those that it reaches!Simran Dhaliwal Slough, England, UKManaging Director at Effective GivingThe Pledge
2014
It's like a tax I am choosing to pay. This year I have been successful, it's my duty to redistribute some of that success.Sophia ChengLondon, England, UKThe Pledge
2020
I’m so excited that Giving What We Can is over 200 times larger than when we launched 10 years ago. It’s overwhelming to be part of such a large and friendly community of people, all striving to make the world a much better place.Toby OrdOxford, England, UKCo-founder of Giving What We Can, philosopher, author of The Precipice, and a researcher at Future of Humanity InstituteFurther Pledge
2009
Getting to 5,000 members absolutely blows my mind. That’s a full 217 times as many members as we had at launch 11 years ago. I remember when I first took the pledge, it felt really quite scary. I was a graduate student at the time and I had a scholarship for my accommodation paid for but I was living on about £4,500 per year and I was trying to give £900 of that away over the year. It was tough. I remember I refused to get a haircut because it seemed like an unnecessary expense… One of the things I worried about back then was whether I’d be a social outcast, always having to explain to people why I’ve chosen this weird life for myself. The answer turned out to be “no”, quite the opposite in fact. The pledge functioned like this bat signal, attracting people all around the world with a similar set of values and it’s been such a joy to see so many people come together and make a commitment to use a significant proportion of their income for the common good. So thank you, for taking the pledge and for showing what it means to take giving seriously.William MacAskillOxford, England, UKCo-founder of Giving What We Can, philosopher, author of Doing Good Better, and a researcher at Forethought FoundationFurther Pledge
2009
“I discovered that by donating a portion of my future income to the most efficient charities, I could save around tens of thousands of years of healthy life. Since I already had most of the things I value in life on my student stipend, I realised that my money would do vastly more good for others than it could for me and decided to make a commitment to donating to the most effective charities I could find. Many people contacted me asking how they could do this as well, which is how I came to set up Giving What We Can.”Toby OrdOxford, England, UKSenior Research Fellow at the Future of Humanity Institute at Oxford UniversityFurther Pledge
2009
“I thought that I would make a relatively small sacrifice to help so many people, but it has turned out to be no real sacrifice at all: the sense of engagement in the project of making the world a better place is worth far more to me than some new gadgets or a slightly larger house.” Toby lives in Oxford with his wife Bernadette Young and their daughter Rose.Toby OrdOxford, England, UKSenior Research Fellow at the Future of Humanity Institute at Oxford UniversityFurther Pledge
2009
…it is the only New Year’s pledge I have ever kept… It is a beautiful thing, that all that quick-fix chasing of chocolate, whiskey and cigarettes can be transformed, caterpillar-to-butterfly-like, into freedom from disease and escape from extreme poverty for someone you will never even meet.Erwan AtchesonBelfast, Northern Ireland, UKResearch Scientist at Queen's University BelfastThe Pledge
2013
If I am normal — let’s assume I am — that means I drink one fewer pint per week, I buy rice that costs 90p instead of £1, I live in a house with 7.6 sq. m less space, my laptop is 2.5 months older than it might otherwise be, and I spend 84 pence less on my mobile phone bill per week. That’s not a comprehensive list, but it’s probably enough to give a sense of what the change in my lifestyle amounts to.Erwan AtchesonBelfast, Northern Ireland, UKResearch Scientist at Queen's University BelfastThe Pledge
2013
I first read about Giving What We Can in a newspaper article almost 10 years ago.  At the time, I strongly felt that I needed to do more to help others, but I wasn’t sure what to do. Giving What We Can provided guidance and inspiration that I needed — an easy-to-follow recipe for doing some good. I can honestly say that it has changed my life. Congratulations on 5000 members!Derek BallFife, Scotland, UKLecturer in the philosophy departments at the University of St AndrewsThe Pledge
2010
There is nothing I could spend my pledge money on that would give me the satisfaction I experience through giving.Lee BishopEdinburgh, Scotland, UKSenior program manager at AmazonThe Pledge
2010
It is astonishing that in such a generous country, where so many people give so much money, that so few people feel they understand which charities are the most cost-effective or best to give their money to. People will always be driven to give to causes that are close to their hearts or have touched them personally, but there can be huge differences between even similar charities in terms of the good that you can achieve by donating.Lee BishopEdinburgh, Scotland, UKSenior program manager at AmazonThe Pledge
2010
By donating 10% of my income I can save lives with money that I don't need. There is nothing I could spend my pledge money on that would give me the sense of satisfaction or well being that I experience through giving. Supporting the most cost-effective charities has got me into work on Monday mornings when the prospect of stacking shelves, painting railings or calling customers didn't ignite me with passion.Lee BishopEdinburgh, Scotland, UKSenior program manager at AmazonThe Pledge
2010
By donating 10% of my income to the most cost-effective charities I’m able to do good on a daily basis, even on an uneventful midweek day when I might otherwise not necessarily have ‘achieved’ anything worthwhile that day.Lee BishopEdinburgh, Scotland, UKSenior program manager at AmazonThe Pledge
2010
The pledge comes out of my wages as soon as they are paid. Even when I first started working and I had a lower income than I do today, I was able to do everything my friends were doing (travel, buying a home, going out for dinner). Taking the pledge doesn't mean a monk-like life of sacrifice and it doesn't mean feeling guilty about every bit of indulgent spending. By having my pledge donation in place, I feel relaxed about indulging the rest of the time.Lee BishopEdinburgh, Scotland, UKSenior program manager at AmazonThe Pledge
2010
I just think that I, as a middle-class white person in the US, have been given more advantages than 99% of the world. A lot of those advantages have been economic. I should be redistributing more of my wealth, which was not necessarily earned.Catherine ThomasPalo Alto, CA, USAPhD student in social and cultural psychology from California who has worked in global health and international development for 11 years.The Pledge
2015
I like the idea that people will give together. I hope the pledge will start to build that social norm toward redistribution, specifically for basic needs and effective charities.Catherine ThomasPalo Alto, CA, USAPhD student in social and cultural psychology from California who has worked in global health and international development for 11 years.The Pledge
2015
Giving What We Can is public and accountable, and I feel like I'm a small part of what is hopefully a growing movement. I especially hope it will grow among middle-class white people in the US to counter income inequality.Catherine ThomasPalo Alto, CA, USAPhD student in social and cultural psychology from California who has worked in global health and international development for 11 years.The Pledge
2015
I’ve known of the Giving What We Can pledge for a few years, but finally pulled the trigger for a couple reasons. One, I’ve simply learned more about the horrific scale of global poverty, and the tractability of ending it.Max GhenisOxnard, CA, USAFounder and President of the UBI CenterThe Pledge
2019
I took the GWWC pledge because I believed my donations could do much more good for others than they could do for me; I had enough money to be happy and productive; and I wanted to encourage others to give for the same reasons. I think there's something powerful about putting our ideals into practice as a group with the core intention of doing the greatest expected good for others. It's been a great way to inspire myself and connect with people who have similar priorities. I'm delighted that our numbers have grown to 5,000, and I look forward to celebrating the 10,000 mark in the future!Nick BecksteadSan Francisco, CA, USAProgram Officer at Open PhilanthropyThe Pledge
2009
…a major barrier for my past self was just that I thought of charitable giving as something cool that ‘other people’ did. I certainly couldn't have seen myself jumping right in by giving away 10% of my income.Richard ChappellMiami, FL, USAAssistant Professor of Philosophy at the University of MiamiThe Pledge
2010
Once you start to think of yourself as the kind of person who really wants to make the world a better place, you'll hopefully find the thought of signing on to GWWC's 10% pledge positively appealing.Richard ChappellMiami, FL, USAAssistant Professor of Philosophy at the University of MiamiThe Pledge
2010
It’s extraordinary to see the way this community has grown over the past decade and all of the good that it has accomplished. When Will MacAskill shared the idea of a giving pledge with me in 2009, I thought it was a great way for a handful of people committed to certain values to raise the cost of drifting away from them. But I don’t think anyone imagined that the community would grow as it has, or that it would help to spark a broader movement. I’m grateful for and inspired by all of the work that so many put into achieving a milestone like this.Ben EidelsonBoston, MA, USAAssistant professor of law at Harvard Law SchoolThe Pledge
2009
When I first learned about Giving What We Can, I remember feeling so relieved that there were all these other people out there who were not just thinking about what we can do for others, but were taking concrete action on that.Julia WiseSomerville, MA, USACommunity health liaison and former social workerThe Pledge
2012
I've felt good about making this commitment. I like having it as part of my routine, something that I know is part of my plan in the years to come. It's a confirmation of what I value—a safe and healthy life not just for me and mine, but for all families around the world.Julia WiseSomerville, MA, USACommunity health liaison and former social workerThe Pledge
2012
The difficulties people said I would face have not materialized. It is astounding to me that I live better than most kings in history: I eat fresher and more varied food, I listen to the world's best music at a press of a button, I have heating, cooling, and internal plumbing in my apartment, and I don't need to worry about being assassinated.Boris YakubchikMorganville, NJ, USADeveloper at Forbes in Jersey City, NJ.The Pledge
2013
It brings me a great deal of satisfaction to know that a significant fraction of my time that I spend at work, I work not to better my life, but to tremendously help thousands of others.Boris YakubchikMorganville, NJ, USADeveloper at Forbes in Jersey City, NJ.The Pledge
2013
I was astounded to learn that by giving to the most cost-effective charities, instead of the regular ones, my $10 could do as much good as $10,000!Boris YakubchikMorganville, NJ, USADeveloper at Forbes in Jersey City, NJ.The Pledge
2013
In my experience, these conversations are friendly and welcome when you share your excitement about the opportunity most of us have to improve the lives of others. The feedback loop is long: conversations you have today might not result in actions until years down the line. Don’t be discouraged. I once gave a short talk in my office about charitable giving; it generated a few lively conversations that week. It’s been a year, and I still have coworkers occasionally approach me to talk about giving. It’s a topic that many people want to talk about, and finding someone who is eager to chat about it is just great.Boris YakubchikMorganville, NJ, USADeveloper at Forbes in Jersey City, NJ.The Pledge
2013
For more than a decade, this pledge has reminded me and inspired me to give. The incredible growth of the effective altruism movement in that time – exemplified by nearly 5000 people taking the GWWC pledge – makes me optimistic about what we can do, as individuals and as a collective. Each of us can make a meaningful difference to the lives of others. Together we can keep each other committed to giving more, and to doing so on the basis of good evidence.Joseph MillumNorthwest, Washington DC, USABioethicist at the National Institutes of HealthThe Pledge
2009
It’s felt extraordinary to be part of a growing movement to try to structurally address those problems with the resources we have available… Now at 10 years on, with Giving What We Can having now having 5,000 taking that pledge, and being part of a larger and flourishing effective altruism movement, it seems like we’re really succeeding… To pause in reflecting on this particular moment in 2020, it feels in some ways a stranger and darker time than the period in which we were setting up to create this movement. But I really think that we’re positioned as effective altruists to be a constructive force for change in the years ahead.Peter EckersleyExpert in law and computer science, who has worked with the Electronic Frontier Foundation and the Partnership on AIThe Pledge
2009

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